Proposition: a bow tie camouflage for hiding in the dusk

This is a collection of notes, ideas and text made by Sophia Ioannou Gjerding. Sophia is the current artist in residence at COMA. She is working on a video installation and some 3D-printed objects. The work will be displayed at the end of November. This week she has been filming and doing research at the Entomological Collections in Lund. During the residency at STPLN, Sophia is exploring photogrammetry--a method that makes it possible to obtain three-dimensional information from photographs. Working with this method, she is using representations of lions, mainly pictures of sculptures found on the internet. An example of this would be the sculpture of the sleeping medici lion located near Vorontsov (Alupka) Palace in Crimea, which Sophia has made into a point cloud using photogrammetry software. This point cloud can be seen in the last picture of this post. Later Sophia will try to recreate three dimensional sculptures from these point clouds through 3d printing.

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Instructions

Mount moths on pins. Stick pins into small notes (as seen below)

Do it on a large area - approximately 2x2 meters

Take a photo of the mounted insects from above

Print photo on fabric in the same format (2x2 meters)

Make clothes from this fabric

“Because no moth is identical”

Above: stills from footage shot at the Entomological Collections in Lund. The moths on the stills are of the specie red underwing ( Catocala nupta ).

Above: stills from footage shot at the Entomological Collections in Lund. The moths on the stills are of the specie red underwing (Catocala nupta).

Before I was told otherwise I called every insect with the form of a bow tie a butterfly.

But where butterflies primarily fly in the daytime, moths generally fly at night. I have learned that the red underwing isn't a butterfly, but a moth. 


Peculiar is the Danish name for a red underwing: “rødt ordensbånd”. Ordensbånd is referring to the jewels and ribbons worn by members of a fraternal organisation. The word is loosely translated as decorations. Maybe the Danish word for red underwing can be translated as “red fraternity ribbon”. To connect one patriarchal invention with another, I can add that from 1974 - 1999 the moth with the conservative name was portrayed on the Danish 100 kroner note. The red underwing on the note was a reprint of a watercolor made by Danish illustrator Ib Andersen. The reprint was reprinted, portrayed on an innumerable amount of banknotes. Through time. Through improved printing technology. It was the identifying mark on many sophisticated copies. 

The underwings which are seen on the photos above look similar to Ib Andersens drawn version, but they also look a lot alike. In fact without the small notes under each moth it takes a trained eye to tell the difference. The small notes tell us where the insect was found and when. Lying there next to each other the notes, the pins and the red underwings form a pattern. Maybe the pattern can be used as a print for a camouflage fabric. 

Maybe the fabric could be used for hiding in the forest around dusk.

Above: 3D-model of the moth species called   Baorisa hieroglyphica  . Actual wingspan 50 mm. This model has a  point cloud  of the sculpture: the sleeping medici lion (located near Vorontsov (Alupka) Palace in Crimea) on its upper wing.    Below: Point cloud of the sculpture: the sleeping medici lion (located near Vorontsov (Alupka) Palace in Crimea)

Above: 3D-model of the moth species called Baorisa hieroglyphica. Actual wingspan 50 mm. This model has a point cloud of the sculpture: the sleeping medici lion (located near Vorontsov (Alupka) Palace in Crimea) on its upper wing.

Below: Point cloud of the sculpture: the sleeping medici lion (located near Vorontsov (Alupka) Palace in Crimea)

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“WTF - Nature does not copy, it generates” 

“Where have you heard that?”

“Read it on the internet!”

Joshua Ng